Worlds Hottest Chili Pepper

Worlds Hottest Chili Pepper

The Trinidad Scorpion Moruga Blend , endemic to the district of Moruga in Trinidad and Tobago, is currently the worlds hottest Chili pepper cultivated. The New Mexico State University’s Chilli Pepper Institute has identified the Trinidad Scorpion Moruga Blend as the newest hottest chili pepper as of February 2012. According to the Institute, the Trinidad Scorpion Moruga Blend ranks as high as 2,009,231 SHU on the Scoville scale, making it the hottest chili pepper in the world to date.

Worlds Hottest Chili Pepper

In 2007, Guinness World Records certified that the Ghost Pepper (Bhut Jolokia) was the worlds hottest chili pepper, 400 times hotter than Tabasco sauce; however, as of 2012 it was superseded by the Trinidad Moruga Scorpion.

 

The pepper, which comes from the central south coast of Trinidad, is certifiably potent: Its mean score on the Scoville scale used to grade peppers topped more than 1.2 million heat units, the testing showed. By comparison, a jalapeno logs about 5,000 on the scale.

“You take a bite. It doesn’t seem so bad, and then it builds and it builds and it builds. So it is quite nasty,” Paul Bosland, renowned pepper expert and director of the chile institute, told the Associated Press.

Researchers were pushed by hot sauce makers, seed producers and others in the spicy food industry to establish the average heat levels for super-hot varieties in an effort to quash unscientific claims of which peppers are actually the hottest.

The golf ball-sized chili pepper scored the highest among a handful of chili cultivars reputed to be among the hottest in the world. Its mean heat topped more than 1.2 million units on the Scoville heat scale, while fruits from an individual plant reached 2 million heat units.

Worlds Hottest Chili Pepper

Aside from the heat, the Trinidad Scorpion Moruga Blend has a tender fruit-like flavor, which makes it a sweet-hot combination. The pepper can be grown from seeds in most parts of the world. In North America, the growing season varies regionally from the last spring hard frost to the first fall hard frost. Freezing weather ends the growing season and kills the plant but otherwise they are perennials which grow all year, slowing in colder weather.

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